23,000 Jihadists in Britain, Not 3,000 As Previously Claimed


Government sources have confessed that there are at least 23,000 jihadists in Britain – more than seven times higher than previously revealed. Until recently, the public had been led to believe there were around 3,000 known jihadists in Britain, with 500 being subject to active investigations led by MI5. Whitehall officials have now disclosed that a further 20,000 individuals have been identified as posing a “residual risk”, according to The Times. Khalid Masood, who ran down a number of pedestrians and stabbed a police constable to death outside the Palace of Westminster in March 2017, was among the pool of individuals who had been reported to the authorities but was not under active surveillance. Manchester Arena killer Salman Abedi, a son of Libyan refugees with Islamist links, had also been reported to the authorities, but, as with Masood, “limited resources” allowed him to slip through the surveillance net. Senior National Co-ordinator for Counter-Terrorism Neil Basu revealed that terror suspects are being arrested “on a near daily basis” in Britain shortly after the Westminster attack – an early hint at the scale of the challenge which Britain faces. UK authorities have identified 23,000 potential jihadist extremists. The problem is much worse than we first thought. pic.twitter.com/Qu2Ap210kl — Nigel Farage
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Schools Asked To ‘Show Sensitivity’ To Muslims By Adapting Classes Around Ramadan


The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) has published a pamphlet asking educators to “show sensitivity” to Muslims during the month of Ramadan as GCSE and A-level exams approach. The body, which represents some 18,000 headteachers and college leaders, according to the MailOnline, recommends schools reschedule revision classes and redesign physical education lesson plans in order to take the religious sensibilities of Muslim pupils into account. Islam forbids eating and drinking during daylight hours during the month of Ramadan. “School and college leaders will also want to consider the possible impact fasting and late night prayers during Ramadan may have on Muslim children when setting dates for other activities, such as sports days, trips and celebrations,” the document adds. ASCL also advises invigilators not to recommend pupils in hot exam rooms take even a “tiny sip of water” unless they appear to be suffering from dehydration, in case this offends Muslims undertaking the fast. “If a student taking an exam is showing any signs that they may be dehydrated, such as a headache or drowsiness, they should be advised to terminate the fast immediately by drinking some water,” the pamphlet cautions. Invigilators are told they should familiarise themselves with
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