‘Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End’ Review: The Greatest Treasure Yet

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The capstone to Naughty Dog’s Uncharted series is a master class in game development on every conceivable level. Few games in the modern day have the sort of magic that immortalizes them in the way that classics like Super Mario Bros. or Final Fantasy have. These days, games try to check so many boxes of features that they begin to blend together, and it becomes difficult to pick out a memorable experience from even a couple of years past. Uncharted 4 bucks that trend toward a bland pastiche of focus-grouped features, and in doing so not only creates a heroic final act for one of gaming’s most beloved characters, but establishes itself as the sort of game that people will fondly remember for years to come. Uncharted 4 doesn’t redefine the action-adventure platformer in any real way. It doesn’t achieve its greatness by being utterly different than what has come before. Rather, the spectacle of Nathan Drake’s ride into the sunset is couched in gameplay mechanics that have been honed as close to perfection as may be possible with modern technology. Everything works in a way that can make you forget you’re holding a controller, as your intent is translated through